Nightcap

  1. Buddhist terrorists and the Zen way of war Brian Victoria, Aeon
  2. Faith and empire: a realistic view of Tibetan Buddhism Ian Johnson, New York Review of Books
  3. A history of Soviet Atheism Elena Leontjeva, Law & Liberty
  4. It’s now Raimondo’s world, and he’s not living in it” Curt Mills, Spectator USA

Nightcap

  1. Buddhists have entered the era of militant tribalism” Hannah Beech, New York Times
  2. The German problem Samuel Goldman, Modern Age
  3. The Soviet century Aaron Smith, Harper’s
  4. Fully automated luxury communism Kristian Niemietz, Quillette

Nightcap

  1. Plato and teaching foreign policy Luke Perez, Duck of Minerva
  2. Suicidal elites Joel Kotkin, Quillette
  3. Debating the far right Chris Dillow, Stumbling & Mumbling
  4. Buddhist Hell park Laetitia Barbier, Atlas Obscura

RCH: Religion in the USSR

That’s the topic of my weekend column at RealClearHistory. An excerpt:

4. Buddhism was also outlawed and persecuted to the fullest extent of the Soviet law. Buddhism was practiced by a few different non-Russian ethnic groups in central Asia, and these small ethnic groups were given more leniency than most, but Buddhism came to be viewed by the Soviet intelligentsia as extremely dangerous, due to the fact that many left-leaning scholars abandoned socialism for Buddhist principles. The work of Andrei Znamenski, a historian of religion and ideology at the University of Memphis, is particularly useful for finding out why this happened.

Please, read the rest. Dr Znamenski, of course, blogs here on occasion, but I do wish he’d do so more often…

Nightcap

  1. How Buddha became a popular Christian saint Blake Smith, America
  2. Russia, Germany at loggerheads over Idlib Yekaterina Chulkovskaya, Al-Monitor
  3. Arab melancholia Thomas Patier, Los Angeles Review of Books
  4. Does Locke’s entanglement with slavery undermine his philosophy? Holly Brewer, Aeon

Nightcap

  1. Examining the state of German identity Sebastian Hammelehle, Der Spiegel
  2. Tadao’s war memory manga Ryan Holmberg, NY Review of Books
  3. The Buddhist monk who became an apostle for sexual freedom Donald Lopez, Aeon
  4. Denmark’s most innovative city Simon Willis, 1843

Nightcap

  1. Abu Raihan al-Biruni, an Islamic scholar from Central Asia, may have discovered the New World centuries before Columbus S. Frederick Starr, History Today
  2. Gendun Chopel: Tibet’s Modern Buddhist Visionary John Butler, Asian Review of Books
  3. Toru Dutt’s strangeness from India and the French Revolution Blake Smith, Coldnoon
  4. Singapore in translation Theophilus Kwek, Times Literary Supplement