Some Monday Links

Freedom through Knowledge: Liberalism, Censorship, and Public Health in Early Planned Parenthood Campaigns (History of Knowledge)

Can Structural Changes Fix the Supreme Court? (Journal of Economic Perspectives)

The Health Care Crucible (The Baffler)

Some Monday Links

The Paris Commune at 150 (The Tablet)

“The greatest legend in proletariat history”, we were told in the modern European history class (back in 2001, probably still a solid claim).

Liberalism and class (Interfluidity)

All Apologies for Democracy (Project Syndicate)

Some Tuesday links

  1. Lawyer for the strongman (from my vault, really good and touches upon an important legal aspect of interwar federal Germany)
  2. Burning bones (a “micro” view on a somewhat narrow matter – cremation of the dead, referring to my country! – but it touches upon human rights in a kind-of-weird way. Still interesting I think)
  3. I Have Come to Bury Ayn Rand” (A prominent evolutionary biologist slays the beast of Individualism)

Nightcap: the end

Folks, I’ve got a ton of writing projects on my plate. I am trying to make the switch from non-fiction to fiction, too. Oh, and I have a small family now. And a career in the private sector that is going quite well. My priorities have changed.

I’ll still be blogging here, of course, but the “nightcaps” are done.

It’s weird how life changes. It’s weird to think that I’ve hitchhiked through Mexico, the U.S., Spain, Italy, Portugal, and France. I lived in Ghana. I did drugs. I listened to political hip-hop and punk rock. I’m a dad now. My oldest child will be 4 soon. I don’t even listen to music anymore. I just sing along with the kids to Mary Poppins songs. Did any of that stuff I learned while young mean anything?

My devotion to liberty has changed, too. I’m not as political as I once was. I’m not as important as I once thought. My voice really doesn’t matter all that much, at least in the public sphere. I don’t vote in American elections, but I do vote at shareholder meetings. My life has shifted inward. My private lives are much more fulfilling than the public ones. At least in this new phase of my life.

Have a good weekend!

Nightcap

  1. The red pill for philosophers and scientists Nick Nielsen, Grand Strategy Annex
  2. “Lived experience” and the Word of God Brendan O’Neill, spiked!
  3. The immigrant’s vote of confidence in America John McGinnis, Law & Liberty
  4. How the world gave up on the stateless Udi Greenberg, New Republic

Nightcap

  1. Biden turns up the heat on America’s cold wars Connor Freeman, Libertarian Institute
  2. Anarchy, security, and changing material contexts (pdf) Daniel Deudney, Security Studies
  3. Leningrad’s rock scene was pretty damn cool Coilin O’Connor, Radio Free Europe
  4. Nations within states and the future of history (pdf) Anthony Reid, ARI WP

Nightcap

  1. Frederick Douglass and a glorious liberty Tony Williams, Law & Liberty
  2. Dealing with terrorists Michael Koplow, Ottomans & Zionists
  3. An oral history of Texas punk Pat Blashill, Southwest Review
  4. Institutions, machines, and complex orders Federico Sosa Valle, NOL

Nightcap

  1. What have we seen in a year of lockdown? Philip Ball, homunculus
  2. The myth of the impartial juror Sonali Chakravarti, Boston Review
  3. June in Arkansas Chloe Honum, Bat City Review
  4. Go Bruins!

Nightcap

  1. Four myths about World War I Mark Harrison, VOXEU
  2. The Spanish electrician who sabotaged the Nazis Tereixa Constenla, El Pais
  3. Liberal piety and power-hungry unscrupulousness Irfan Khawaja, Policy of Truth
  4. Fifty years of fear and loathing David Wills, Quillette

Nightcap

  1. Our very British brand of totalitarianism James Jeffrey, Critic
  2. Federalist versus democratic peace (pdf) Daniel Deudney, EJIR
  3. Go Bruins!

Nightcap

  1. British and American fascism, past and present Priya Satia, Los Angeles Review of Books
  2. Why a world state is inevitable: the logic of anarchy (pdf) Alexander Wendt, EJIR
  3. Greater Britain or greater synthesis? (pdf) Daniel Deudney, RIS
  4. The Sung empire vs. the Byzantine “republic” Branko Milanovic, globalinequality

Nightcap

  1. Conventional economics is more radical than Marxism Chris Dillow, Stumbling & Mumbling
  2. What is “conservatism” in the US these days? Daniel McCarthy, Claremont Review of Books
  3. The cultural contradictions of American education Kay Hymowitz, National Affairs
  4. Political bargaining in a federation: Buchanan meets Coase (pdf) Mark Gradstein, CEPR

Nightcap

  1. Hong Kong voices in American politics Hui & Shum, Diplomat
  2. Who would rather stay at home alone? Elizabeth Brina, Gulf Coast
  3. The Carolingians, the Church, & constitutions (pdf) Andrew Young, SSJ
  4. How common is democracy throughout history? David Stasavage, Aeon

Nightcap

  1. The Syrian intervention at 10 Paul Antonopoulous, antiwar.com (h/t Mark from Placerville)
  2. Pitting people against each other” (pdf) Waheed Hussain, P&PA
  3. The mythical war scare of 1983 Simon Miles, War on the Rocks
  4. History’s empire William Anthony Hay, Law & Liberty

Nightcap

  1. Experiments in self-reliance (Thoreau to Texas) Jonathan Malesic, Commonweal
  2. The Aztec revival in California’s public schools Christopher Silvester, Critic
  3. Racism, Georgetown law, and Salem witch trials John McWhorter, It Bears Mentioning
  4. How Ron Paul empowered the Federal Reserve George Selgin, Alt-M