Nightcap

  1. From “open seas” to unconstitutional warfare Grant Starrett
  2. From “open governance” to covert wars Christopher Preble, War on the Rocks
  3. What reconstruction in Syria might look like Frederick Deknatel, Los Angeles Review of Books
  4. The most dangerous man in the world James Pontuso, Claremont Review of Books

Nightcap

  1. Who owns the Crusades? Josephine Livingstone, New Republic
  2. Why the Crusades remain fascinating Jonathan Sumption, Spectator
  3. The forgotten battle of World War II Francis Sempa, Asian Review of Books
  4. The ironic feudalist (Japanese reaction) Jeremy Woolsey, Aeon

Nightcap

  1. Austin City Limits Kevin Williamson, Claremont Review of Books
  2. Boredom and the British Empire Erik Linstrum, History Today
  3. The little-known war crime in Tokyo Hiroaki Sato, Japan Times
  4. China’s “Hundred Schools of Thought” Ian Johnson, ChinaFile

Nightcap

  1. Who is Joe Epstein? Jonathan Leaf, Modern Age
  2. “Company-style” paintings from 19th century Burma Jonathan Saha, Colonizing Animals
  3. Nazis: A Modern Field Guide Jonathan Kay, Quillette
  4. The Dangers of Letting Someone Else Decide Jonathan Klick, Cato Unbound

Nightcap

  1. Examining the state of German identity Sebastian Hammelehle, Der Spiegel
  2. Tadao’s war memory manga Ryan Holmberg, NY Review of Books
  3. The Buddhist monk who became an apostle for sexual freedom Donald Lopez, Aeon
  4. Denmark’s most innovative city Simon Willis, 1843

RCH: America’s WWII internment camps

Folks, I forgot to link to last weekend’s piece at RealClearHistory. It was about World War II internment camps in the US. An excerpt:

As a quick historical reminder, the United States government, under the direct orders of Democratic president Franklin D. Roosevelt, imprisoned hundreds of thousands of Americans and recently immigrated foreigners for the crime of being Japanese or German (the Italians got some flack, too, but less so than the other two), or for having a Japanese or German surname.

The vast majority of these imprisoned people were Japanese or Japanese-American. In fact, the total amount of interred German or German-American prisoners was roughly 11,000, and the number of Italian or Italian-Americans much smaller than that.

Please, read the rest.

“Horrors Didn’t End When Bataan Death March Did”

That’s the title of last week‘s Tuesday post over at RealClearHistory. I’ve been so busy I forgot to share it here. Check it out:

Camp O’Donnell was no relief from the Death March of Bataan. In it, disease spread like wildfire and starvation was rampant. The Japanese, who were fighting Americans elsewhere and Filipino guerrillas close by, had no empathy for their prisoners. The prisoners who survived the harsh march from Bataan had another 3 ½ years of hard manual labor in prison camps to look forward to, if they survived the horrific conditions of the camps.

As the Allies began slowly retaking the Philippines from Japanese forces, these prisoners of war were shipped from one of the 70 prisoner camps on the archipelago to China and Japan itself to continue their slave labor for the Empire. The Japanese shipped these prisoners to the mainland on unmarked vessels, a violation of the Geneva Conventions, and it’s possible that the American and British Navies may have inadvertently sunk a number of these vessels.

Please, read the rest.