Nightcap

  1. The last (effortless) rulers of the world Branko Milanovic, globalinequality
  2. How TikTok is rewriting the world John Herrman, New York Times
  3. Empires of the weak: European imperialism reconsidered Peter Gordon, Asian Review of Books
  4. The place that launched a thousand ships Sean McMeekin, Literary Review

Nightcap

  1. Ottoman nostalgia (back to the Balkans) Alev Scott, History Today
  2. Did post-Marxist theories destroy Communist regimes? Branko Milanovic, globalinequality
  3. Islam in Eastern Europe (a silver thread) Jacob Mikanowski, Los Angeles Review of Books
  4. Against Imperial Nostalgia: Or why Empires are Kaka Barry Stocker, NOL

Nightcap

  1. The St. Valentine’s Day massacre Evan Bleier, RealClearLife
  2. The Sons of Mars and the ancient Mediterranean Erich Anderson, History Today
  3. The two trilemmas today Branko Milanovic, globalinequality
  4. How the United States reinvented empire Patrick Iber, New Republic

Nightcap

  1. Pontius Pilate: the first Christian? Branko Milanovic, globalinequality
  2. Politics and forgiveness – a leftist proposal John Holbo, Crooked Timber
  3. Bumps on the road to pot legalization Irfan Khawaja, Policy of Truth
  4. America’s bewildering imperialism Damon Linker, the Week

Nightcap

  1. Olive Oatman Ann Turner, 3 Quarks Daily
  2. Don’t let the rise of Europe steal world history Peter Frankopan, Aeon
  3. Africa’s forgotten empires David Olusoga, New Statesman
  4. Colonialism: Myths and Realities Brandon Christensen, NOL

RCH: Annexation of the Hawaiian islands

That’s the topic of my latest over at RealClearHistory. An excerpt:

That is to say, there are theoretical lessons we can draw from the American annexation of Hawaii and apply them to today’s world. The old Anglo-Dutch playbook turned out to serve American imperial interests well, especially when contrasted with the disastrous Spanish-American War of 1898, when the United States seized the Philippines, Cuba, Guam, and Puerto Rico from Spain in an unwarranted act of aggression. Hawaii, now an American state, has one of the highest standards of living in the world (including for its indigenous and Japanese citizens), while the territories seized by the U.S. from Spain continue to wallow in relative poverty and autocratic governance.

Please, read the rest.