Nightcap

  1. Centrists against freedom Chris Dillow, Stumbling and Mumbling
  2. Civility and Property vs. Politics Jeff Deist, Power & Market
  3. Justice Kennedy Retires, and the Legal and Political Ramifications Are Immense David French, the Corner
  4. Religious Bric-à-Brac and Tolerance of Violent Jihad Jacques Delacroix, Liberty Unbound

Nightcap

  1. How did the West get religious freedom? Mark Koyama, Defining Ideas
  2. Are asylum rights misguided? Tyler Cowen, Marginal Revolution
  3. What Does China’s 5th Research Station Mean for Antarctic Governance? Nengye Liu, the Diplomat
  4. The forthcoming changes in capitalism? Branko Milanovic, globalinequality

Nightcap

  1. Tech platforms and the knowledge problem Frank Pasquale, American Affairs
  2. Exploring the New Science of Psychedelics Mick Brown, Literary Review
  3. A new history of Islamic mysticism Kamal Gasimov, Voices on Central Asia
  4. Within the triangle of politics, philosophy, and religion Aurelian Craiutu, Law & Liberty

The Why of Religious Freedom

The blogosphere has exploded over wedding cake. The Supreme Court has splattered the internet with fondant and rage. Baker Jack Phillips, who refused to bake a cake for a same-sex wedding, has achieved a modest win: human rights commissions cannot exhibit a hostility toward religion when enforcing anti-discrimination laws.

When a major religious-rights case hits the news, I’ve noticed a pattern. The outrage extends not to just the individual case but to the concept of religious freedom generally. Angry bloggers and tweeters love to insert scare quotes around the phrase “religious freedom,” as if donning latex gloves to handle toxic sludge. And the Colorado judge below certainly showed deep disdain for Mr. Phillips’ religious beliefs, which is perhaps the major reason that Phillips won. This pattern of skepticism toward religious freedom writ large signals that we should perhaps retreat to first principles. Why do religious practices and beliefs receive special treatment? Continue reading

BC’s weekend reads

  1. Who’s who in Hamburg’s G20 protests
  2. But, if Marxism is not inevitable, it is nothing. Ronald Reagan, with his abiding fear that the Evil Empire would spread without intervention, was, in this sense, a much better Marxist than David Roediger could ever hope to be.
  3. It’s business as usual between Turkey and the EU
  4. So far there is not much sign of the fresh dawn that IS’s downfall should bring.
  5. Hell Makes the News