Nightcap

  1. Kurds fed up with Erdogan and the PKK Fazel Hawramy, Al-Monitor
  2. Somalia’s fractious politics Anzalone & Hansen, War on the Rocks
  3. How to make anti-terrorism a misnomer Michael Koplow, Ottomans & Zionists
  4. Guess the rain’s down on Titan Caleb Scharf, Life, Unbounded

Nightcap

  1. Why ethnic separatism doesn’t work Alice Su, Aeon
  2. Alan Dershowitz is lying to you Ken White, Popehat
  3. Win for Erdogan, betrayal for the Kurds Cengiz Candar, Al-Monitor
  4. Which political axis will emerge? Arnold Kling, askblog

Nightcap

  1. African soldiers (excellent film review) Jeremy Harding, London Review of Books
  2. Not born in the USA Irfan Khawaja, Policy of Truth
  3. Iraq’s Kurds versus Turkey’s Kurds Mahmut Bozarslan, Al-Monitor
  4. Branko Milanovic’s confusion on inequality David Henderson, EconLog

Nightcap

  1. Why Czechs don’t speak German Jacklyn Janeksela, BBC
  2. The Kurds, Sykes-Picot and the quest for redrawing borders Nick Danforth, BPC
  3. The language of the economy: prices Rick Weber, NOL
  4. A Balkan border change the West should welcome Marko Prelec, Politico EU

Nightcap

  1. The road to nowhere: Manbij, Turkey, and America’s dilemma in Syria Aaron Stein, War on the Rocks
  2. The U.S. and Turkey Scott Sumner, EconLog
  3. The Kurdish issue in Turkey Barry Stocker, NOL
  4. Is nationalism obsolete? Rachel Lu, the Week

Nightcap

  1. Kurdistan still has a chance (2014) Avedis Hadjian, International Business Times
  2. The invincible Mrs Thatcher Charles Moore, Vanity Fair
  3. “Enhance your penis!” Arnold Kling, Medium
  4. The influence of Karl Marx—a counterfactual Branko Milanovic, globalinequality

Eye Candy: Kurdistan

NOL map Kurdistan.png
Click here to zoom (courtesy of the excellent Decolonial Atlas)

Countries with significant Kurdish populations in the Near East: Turkey, Syria, Iraq, and Iran.

Countries with significant Kurdish populations in the Near East that the United States has bombed or put boots on the ground in: Iraq and Syria.

Countries with significant Kurdish populations in the Near East that the United States has threatened to bomb and possibly invade: Iran.

Countries with significant Kurdish populations in the Near East that the United States is allied with: Turkey.

Three of the four countries with significant Kurdish populations in the Near East are (or was, in the case of Iraq) considered hostile to the US government, so the use of Kurds to further American Realpolitik in the region is almost obvious, until you consider that Turkey has been a longtime ally of Washington.

Suppose you’re a big-time Washington foreign policy player. Do you arm Kurdish militias in Syria, encourage continued political autonomy in Kurdish Iraq, finance Kurdish discontent in Iran, and shrug your shoulders at Istanbul? Seriously, what do you do in this situation?