Nightcap

  1. No easy road: easements and occupation in the West Bank Irfan Khawaja, Policy of Truth
  2. Clouds over the Pacific: War, Stagnation, and the end of the Asian Century James Holmes, National Review
  3. Was philosophy founded by non-Western women? Dag Herbjørnsrud, Aeon
  4. Natural History of a Cherry Tree Nick Nielsen, Grand Strategy Annex

Nightcap

  1. Knowledge gave rise to, and empowered, the State Peter Burke, History Today
  2. Why not a Palestinian Singapore? Michel Kochin, Claremont Review of Books
  3. Jacques Derrida and the problems of presence Derek Attridge, Footnotes to Plato
  4. An argument against world government Robin Hanson, Overcoming Bias

From the Comments: How can we not consent to government if we obey it voluntarily?

Irfan Khawaja has a good argument on Yoram Hazony’s new book on nationalism, which is being thoroughly and thoughtfully dissected by Arnold Kling:

Does anyone understand the point that Kling and/or Hazony are making about the relation between legitimacy based on voluntary acceptance, and consent? On the one hand, the claim is that in a legitimate government, we obey the law “voluntarily”; on the other hand, the claim is that we do not consent to government. How can we not consent to government if we obey it voluntarily? Coming the other way around: how can we obey it voluntarily if we don’t consent to it? Even if Hazony wants to broaden consent beyond the Lockean account, that’s still a broadening of the conditions of consent, not a nullification of the role of consent. The combination of claims that Kling attributes to Hazony does not seem coherent.

Well?

As a reminder, this is not a philosophical argument. Well, it is but it isn’t. I suspect this is about Israel and Palestine as much as it is about logical rigor. Stay tuned, and don’t be shy about having your say!

Nightcap

  1. Identity: the lies that bind Laura Miller, Slate
  2. Puzzles about college Javier Hidalgo, Bleeding Heart Libertarians
  3. Nike is winning the culture war David French, National Review
  4. Oslo is dead. Long live Oslo! Martin Indyk, the Atlantic

Nightcap

  1. The lost cause of the confederation Michael Koplow, Ottomans and Zionists
  2. When Concorde was the future Stuart Nathan, 1843
  3. Young and Russian in DC Ben Schreckinger, Politico
  4. The 50-year fall of the American middle class Regina Munch, Commonweal

Nightcap

  1. A new history of Islamic Spain Peter Gordon, Asian Review of Books
  2. A Palestinian perspective on Labour’s anti-Semitism row Nimer Sultany, Disorder of Things
  3. The crumbling of French culture Guillaume de Thieulloy, Law & Liberty
  4. Can Asia and Europe make America’s alliances great again? Tongfi Kim, the Diplomat

Nightcap

  1. Before Indiana Jones came Abraham Hyacinthe Anquetil-Duperron Blake Smith, Aeon
  2. Can economists and humanists ever be friends? John Lanchester, New Yorker
  3. A Guaranteed Income would undermine the social virtues of work John McGinnis, Law & Liberty
  4. On Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Palestine, and the Left Corey Robin, Crooked Timber