Nightcap

  1. A German history of the Balkans Tony Barber, Financial Times
  2. A Brazilian history of the Atlantic slave trade Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra, Not Even Past
  3. A conservative history of America at its peak Ross Douthat, New York Times
  4. The emotional lives of others Andrew Beatty, Aeon

Nightcap

  1. Why Hannah Arendt is the philosopher for now Lyndsey Stonebridge, New Statesman
  2. Does IR really have a “culture problem?” Peter Henne, Duck of Minerva
  3. The Kosovo War in retrospect Goldgeier & Grgic, War on the Rocks
  4. The final treasure from the Tolkien hoard? Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Review of Books

Afternoon Tea: Ahinora (1925)

From the Bulgarian artist Ivan Milev:

nol art milev ahinora 1925
Click here to zoom

Bulgaria is a lot closer to the Orient than, say, France or the U.K. Just look at the style of fashion worn by this woman. It’s amazing!

Nightcap

  1. Why Czechs don’t speak German Jacklyn Janeksela, BBC
  2. The Kurds, Sykes-Picot and the quest for redrawing borders Nick Danforth, BPC
  3. The language of the economy: prices Rick Weber, NOL
  4. A Balkan border change the West should welcome Marko Prelec, Politico EU

Nightcap

  1. Turkish underworld joins war on journalists Amberin Zaman, Al-Monitor
  2. Turkish underworld has long history of working for Ankara Barry Stocker, NOL
  3. Russia meddles in Greece-Macedonia name bargain Kerin Hope, Financial Times
  4. The ugly plight of Turkey’s hidden Armenians Kapil Komireddi, the National

Nightcap

  1. Linking Eastern Christianity with capitalism Bruce Clark, Erasmus
  2. Why were (are) the Balkans underdeveloped? Branko Milanovic, globalinequality
  3. What Nikolai Kardashev really said JN Nielsen, Centauri Dreams
  4. Chernobyl was a disaster by design Tobie Mathew, Literary Review

Nightcap

  1. Piracy in Antarctica Philip Hoare, Spectator
  2. Federalism, good (Canada) and bad (E.U.) Nick Rowe, Worthwhile Canadian Initiative
  3. Why Macedonia’s name is such a problem Nikola Zečević, National Interest
  4. How international hegemony changes hands Kori Schake, Cato Unbound