Nightcap

  1. James Buchanan calling the kettle black David Glasner, Uneasy Money
  2. The war that never ended Patrick Hagopian, History Today
  3. ‘The Mind of Pope Francis’ J Matthew Ashley, Commonweal
  4. Mueller’s done. What now? Samuelsohn & Gerstein, Politico

Nightcap

  1. To love is no easy task (America is just fine) Rachel Vorona Cote, New Republic
  2. Chronic vomiting (medical marijuana) Christopher Andrews, OUPblog
  3. The Neanderthal renaissance Rebecca Wragg Sykes, Aeon
  4. A mild defense of Andrew Johnson (the American president) RealClearHistory

Nightcap

  1. Trump’s wall and the legal perils of “emergency powers” Ilya Somin, Volokh Conspiracy
  2. Can Trump spin a wall from nothing? Michael Kruse, Politico
  3. In defence of conservative Marxism Chris Dillow, Stumbling & Mumbling
  4. We must stand strong against the men who would be kings Charles Cooke, National Review

Nightcap

  1. A visit with Dr Quack (feeling just fine) Liam Taylor, 1843
  2. Rushdie’s deal with the Devil Kevin Blankinship, Los Angeles Review of Books
  3. The importance of recognition (Venezuela) Elsy Gonzalez, Duck of Minerva
  4. Should judges pay attention to Trump’s tweets? Amelia Thomson-DeVeaux, FiveThirtyEight

Nightcap

  1. Checks and Balances Jonathan Adler, Volokh Conspiracy
  2. Trump’s relationship with Fox News starts to show cracks Rebecca Morin, Politico
  3. Italy versus the EU (again) Alberto Mingardi, EconLog
  4. How technology and masturbation tamed the sexual revolution Ross Douthat, New York Times

Nightcap

  1. How to democratize the US Supreme Court Henry Farrell, Crooked Timber
  2. How to democratize the US Supreme Court Samuel Moyn, Boston Review
  3. How to democratize the American political system Corey Robin, Jacobin
  4. The Hébertists, or Exaggerators, went to the guillotine in March of 1794 Wikipedia

RCH: 10 most divisive Supreme Court justices in American history

It turns out that SCOTUS appointments have had a long history of dividing American society. An excerpt:

9. Roger Taney (1836-64). Taney rose up the political ranks as Andrew Jackson’s right-hand man. Jackson tried to get him on the Supreme Court in 1835 but his nomination was rejected by anti-Jacksonian Whigs in the Senate. After the Whigs were swept away in the 1836 election campaign, Jackson renominated Taney, but this time for the position of Chief Justice, and he was confirmed 21-15 after a bitter debate in the Senate. The Taney court is responsible for the Dred Scott case that tore the fledgling republic apart, and for helping Jackson abolish the national bank. Taney and Lincoln clashed often, too, as Taney ruled that Lincoln’s suspension of habeas corpus was unconstitutional, but Taney never did go home during the Civil War and served out his term as Chief Justice until his death in 1864. He holds the second-longest tenure of any Chief Justice.

Please, read the rest, and try to remember: this divisiveness is a feature of the system, not a bug.