Nightcap

  1. International arbitration, 17th century style Eric Schliesser, Digressions & Impressions
  2. We are no longer a serious people Antonio Martínez, Pull Request
  3. Networked planetary governance Anne-Marie Slaughter (interview), Noema
  4. 5 O’Clockface Sharon Olds, Threepenny Review

Nightcap

  1. Why Angela Merkel has lasted so long Wolfgang Streeck, spiked!
  2. United States of Greater Austria Wikipedia
  3. Afghanistan and liberal hegemony Lawrence Freedman, New Statesman
  4. Diary of the guy who drove the Trojan Horse back from Troy James Folta, New Yorker

Nightcap

  1. Afghanistan has too much sovereignty Fernando Teson, RCL
  2. Pakistan’s masochistic support for the Taliban Kunwar Shahid, Spectator
  3. Has capitalism run out of steam? Dominique Routhier, LARB
  4. Here come the robot nurses Anna Guevarra, Boston Review

Nightcap

  1. Is Norway the new East India Company? Branko Milanovic, globalinequality
  2. A garden tree Eric Schliesser, Digressions & Impressions
  3. Indian migration and empire Bridget Anderson, Disorder of Things
  4. A “conservative” case for reparations Jacques Delacroix, NOL

Nightcap

  1. All-inclusive magic mushroom retreats Max Berlinger, Bloomberg
  2. What it is to be “young” or “youthful” Eric Schliesser, Digressions & Impressions
  3. Indian migration and empire Luke de Noronha, Disorder of Things
  4. Why not rectify past injustices? Bryan Caplan, EconLog

Nightcap

  1. Why is there no Rooseveltian school of foreign policy? Deudney & Ikenberry, Foreign Policy
  2. It’s time to drop the curtain on Japan’s colonial legacy Meindert Boersma, Lausan
  3. The ides of August (Afghanistan) Sarah Chayes (h/t Mark from Placerville)
  4. Rep. Barbara Lee on Afghanistan, 20 years later Abigail Tracy, Vanity Fair

Nightcap

  1. Property rights imply social liability, not privilege Rosolino Candela, EconLog
  2. The lingering scars of World War I Cal Flyn, Atlas Obscura
  3. Is the Arctic turning blue? (hawkish) Sonoko Kuhara, Diplomat
  4. Myanmar (or is it Burma?) Zachary Abuza, War on the Rocks

Nightcap

  1. Placing the American secession in global perspective Steven Pincus, Age of Revolutions
  2. Trotsky after Kolakowski Branko Milanovic, globalinequality
  3. A guide to finding faith Ross Douthat, New York Times
  4. Cancel culture: A recantation Irfan Khawaja, Policy of Truth

Nightcap

  1. Art and exile in the Third Republic Hannah Stamler, the Nation
  2. Spending on infrastructure doesn’t always end well Richard White, Conversation
  3. Kabul and Chicago NEO, Nebraska Energy Observer
  4. The price of Tucker Carlson’s soul Andrew Sullivan, Weekly Dish

Nightcap

  1. A fourth globalization Marc Levinson, Aeon
  2. The Brazilianization of the world Alex Hochuli, American Affairs
  3. On American foreign policy Eric Schliesser, Digressions & Impressions
  4. Whither sovereignty Scott Sumner, EconLog

Some Monday links

I didn’t see a draft by Michalis this week, so I thought I’d jump in and substitute. I hope is well with everybody.

  1. Before sovereignty: society and politics in ancien régime Europe (pdf)
  2. Greater Canada, from the Rio Grande River to the Beaufort Sea (pdf)
  3. State anarchy as order (pdf)

Some Monday Links

Symposium: Washington Consensus Revisited (Journal of Economic Perspectives)

Three Days at Camp David: The Fiftieth Anniversary (The International Economy)

Friends, Romans, Countrymen (Lapham’s Quarterly)

Some Monday Links

Japan’s Offbeat Olympics Opening Ceremony (Hyperallergic)

Stick a logo on it: the Olympics and the mediocrity of contemporary design (Prospect)

The Best-Selling Car in America, Every Year Since 1978 (Visual Capitalist)

Some Monday Links

Vaccine Mandates and Personal Liberty Can Coexist (Bloomberg)

Although the sentiment may seem paradoxical, libertarians should cheer this week’s decision by a federal judge upholding Indiana University’s vaccine mandate for students.

So argues professor Stephen L. Carter in this interesting piece. In short, a mandate checks the boxes if it is instated in a decentralized and narrow fashion.

Berlin in 1946 was a cultural battlefield unlike any before (Crime Reads)

Dismal Economics (Project Syndicate).

A review of four books challenging mainstream, neoclassical economics. In The Corruption of Economics, the author Mason Gaffney (btw, he passed away just over a year ago) proposes that the 19th century’s American universities perceived Georgist ideas as a threat to their vested interest in land-owning, and actively suppressed them. His work on the Stratagem against Henry George has been referenced in a NOL piece by – the also late – Fred Foldvary.