Nightcap

  1. The original meaning of the 14th Amendment Damon Root, Reason
  2. Understanding politics today Stephen Davies, Cato Unbound
  3. It sometimes begins with Emerson Irfan Khawaja, Policy of Truth
  4. RealClearHistory‘s 10 best history films of 2018

Nightcap

  1. American Nightmare: the story of a prime FBI suspect in 1996 Atlanta Marie Brenner, Vanity Fair
  2. The disappearing conservative professor Jon Shields, National Affairs
  3. Why the British love the oak tree Philip Marsden, Spectator
  4. Russia, Turkey, and the fate of Idlib Ömer Özkizilcik, Cairo Review

Nightcap

  1. Police tailgating as entrapment Irfan Khawaja, Policy of Truth
  2. The mandatory canteens of communist China Hunter Lu, Atlas Obscura
  3. Will Shiite militias become Iraqi Basij? Hamdi Malik, Al-Monitor
  4. When details matter (Brexit) Chris Dillow, Stumbling & Mumbling

Nightcap

  1. The return of Henry George Pierre Lemieux, EconLog
  2. The politics of purity and indigenous rights Grant Havers, Law & Liberty
  3. The Ottoman Empire’s first map of the United States Nick Danforth, the Vault
  4. The age that women have babies: how a gap divides America Bui & Miller, the Upshot

10 horrific ways to die (RCH)

Yes, that’s the subject of my weekend column over at RealClearHistory. An excerpt:

4. Cutting off limbs/flaying. The English version of being hanged, drawn, and quartered involved removing genitals, but did any other society in history stoop so low? Um, yes. Not only have penises and/or testicles been removed and vaginas flayed, but they have sometimes been displayed as trophies, eaten, or converted into jewelry. Genitals aren’t the only limbs to have been removed over the years. Fingers and toes, tongues, breasts, eyes, ears, lips, nipples, noses, kneecaps, fingernails, eyelids, skin, and bones have all been forcibly removed over years by governments exacting punishment. Aside from the removal of genitals, flaying is probably the worst of the bunch. That’s when you beat somebody so hard that their skin comes off.

I had a lot of fun writing this, and I suspect my ever-so-patient editor had a lot of fun reading (and editing) it. I hope you enjoy it too! Here’s the rest of it.

RCH: America’s WWII internment camps

Folks, I forgot to link to last weekend’s piece at RealClearHistory. It was about World War II internment camps in the US. An excerpt:

As a quick historical reminder, the United States government, under the direct orders of Democratic president Franklin D. Roosevelt, imprisoned hundreds of thousands of Americans and recently immigrated foreigners for the crime of being Japanese or German (the Italians got some flack, too, but less so than the other two), or for having a Japanese or German surname.

The vast majority of these imprisoned people were Japanese or Japanese-American. In fact, the total amount of interred German or German-American prisoners was roughly 11,000, and the number of Italian or Italian-Americans much smaller than that.

Please, read the rest.

Nightcap

  1. The man who went to the North Korean place that ‘doesn’t exist’ Megha Mohan, BBC
  2. Assessing Our Frayed Society with (German-Korean philosopher) Byung-Chul Han Scott Beauchamp, Law & Liberty
  3. Baxter Street & Jury Duty, Summer of 2016 Edward Miller, Coldnoon
  4. Ta-Nehisi Coates & the Afro-Pessimist Temptation Darryl Pinckney, New York Review of Books