Black-and-white libertarianism

I was hanging out in my daughter’s room the other day and noticed a new picture of her on the wall. My daughter is nearly 3 now, but that photo showed to me a person who will someday be a young girl, a woman, a daughter-in-law, a college student, a worker, and, if all goes accordingly, a grandmother or at least a sassy old lady who plays too much bingo down at the local Methodist church.

A little later on that same night, after the kids were tucked in and sleeping and I was on this damned computer doing NOL stuff, I thought about liberty and what it might mean to my daughter, and also about how the meaning of liberty has changed over time in my own mind.

For starters, “liberty” is kind of a corny term now. It’s becoming archaic. “Freedom” has started to become a corny word, too. (Its cause is not helped by American politicians using the term “freedom” to describe Washington’s overseas ambitions.)

Knowing what I know now about the libertarian movement in the United States, I don’t think I will introduce my daughter to the formal movement. No summer seminars, no Reason subscription, no Ayn Rand moment where I hand her Atlas Shrugged and tell her how much that book has changed my life.

I think a better avenue for discovering her freedom will be to encourage her to go to the best college she can get in to (sorry Rick), figure out a way to be grateful for employment, and read plenty of literature and science fiction.

The formal libertarian atmosphere probably won’t be around in the same way it was for us. Will it be more decentralized or more centralized? I don’t know how academic it will be, either. I hope it’s somewhat academic, with more of an emphasis on history and culture rather than economics and philosophy. The think tanks and foundations will still be around. They’ll still be dirty and they’ll still better than the alternatives. We had FEE and IHS. FEE has already fallen off the map. IHS might still be around, but it will have plenty of competition.

What if my daughter discovers my notes on liberty? Will she be proud? Will she giggle? Or worse: Will she be embarrassed? Will she become a libertarian if she stumbles across my writings? It’s too early to say. That photo, though, of a little human being smiling back at me in black-and-white, was profound. She is my daughter, sure, but she is someone different than me. She is her own self.

Nightcap

  1. How to flip a yield curve George Selgin, Alt-M
  2. How ergodicity reimagines economics Mark Buchanan, Aeon
  3. How to think better about debt Lou Brown, Crooked Timber
  4. Why even have kids in today’s world? Bryan Caplan, EconLog

Nightcap

  1. Reflections on Zimbabwe and its white folks Diana Stone, London Review of Books
  2. Whose civilization? Which clash? Daniel McCarthy, Modern Age
  3. Should the government really make parenting ‘easy’? Rachel Lu, the Week
  4. What the… ?

Nightcap

  1. Germany is struggling with its place in the world Ulrike Franke, War on the Rocks
  2. German parents are more laid back than American ones Lenore Skenazy, Hit & Run (Reason)
  3. How to walk through a Berlin park Elnathan John, 1843
  4. How is the world ruled? Branko Milanovic, globalinequality