Libertarian Foreign Policy: A Dialogue on Imperialism

Like shooting fish in a barrel…

I think that’s not the Libertarian position. The party’s position instead is to wait until we are attacked, as in Pearl Harbor, to engage in active defense on the basis of a military establishment much smaller than the current one. Please, correct me on these specific points if my perception is wrong.

To be honest, I have no idea what the LP’s position on foreign policy is. I don’t think it worth my time to even look it up either. I don’t know why you keep conflating libertarians with an irrelevant political party, either. It probably helps your position to look better, I suppose, but most libertarians vote and participate within the two parties that are dominant today. Just look at yourself. I know I do.

This particular aspect of your argument is disturbing though:

The party’s position instead is to wait until we are attacked, as in Pearl Harbor, to engage in active defense on the basis of a military establishment much smaller than the current one.

First of all, the United States didn’t “wait around” for Japan to attack us at Pearl Harbor. Nobody saw it coming, including, I am sure, a large number of Japanese policymakers and elites. The assumption that the U.S. was innocent in the whole affair is disingenuous as well. Did Roosevelt not impose an oil embargo on Japan? Is that not, essentially, an act of war? If we remember our Bastiat, then we must surely realize that when goods stop crossing borders, armies will.

I think it is also a mistake to confuse Japan – an industrialized imperial power – with the likes of North Korea and Iran. I have already addressed this in a number of other arguments, so I don’t think it is worth repeating here. Free men have nothing to fear from toothless despots. It is our own government that we must be wary of, first and foremost.

Drumming up fear and suspicion of far-away despots has never had a place at the table of Liberty. It is not hard to see why.

You refer mysteriously to the constitutional limits of military actions. I think both the Iraq war and the Afghanistan wars are constitutional. I think, the help to Libyan is borderline.

What part of “only Congress can declare war” don’t you understand? Tinkering with words is something only liberals do, I have found.

Speaking of bleeding hearts, my answer to your strange question regarding Rwanda is a wholehearted and resounding “yes“.

The people who took part in those massacres were all or mostly adults. That means that they are capable of making decisions for themselves. Paternalism is another idea that has no place at the table of Liberty. The people responsible for the massacres in Rwanda were the Rwandans. If we stretch this, we can even pin some of the blame on European imperialism. But to the bleeding heart liberal, living safely and comfortably in the United States, the Rwandan massacres were all our fault! We didn’t do anything about it!

95% of all terrorist acts in the world in the past twenty years have been committed by people who call themselves Muslims and most often, in the name of Islam.

It would be nice if you could provide some statistics to back up this rather mendacious claim. What about Columbia? Sri Lanka? What about the fact that most terrorist acts committed by Muslims kill other Muslims?

The rest of your argument I can mostly agree with. Except, of course, for the part where you have celebrated the successes of removing dictators from Iraq and Libya. Although I usually don’t have any problem wading in to a fight to help out a friend, I think I would be better to let you stand on your own for this one. Libya and Iraq are successes of American bombing campaigns and “nation-building” exercises. Yeah, sure, Dr Delacroix, and fairies sometimes fly out of my butt when I fart.

4 thoughts on “Libertarian Foreign Policy: A Dialogue on Imperialism

  1. “What part of “only Congress can declare war” don’t you understand? Tinkering with words is something only liberals do, I have found.”

    I agree that only Congress has the Constitutional power to declare war, but Congress has abdicated that power to the executive by accepting the theory and practice of “The War Powers Act/ War Powers Resolution”. This abdicated power has been used by as many so-called conservative Presidents as liberal. It is an abomination that needs to be repealed.

    Considering the nuclear arsenal at the U.S. government’s/military disposal, we have more than enough time and safeguards to consider geopolitical threats in a much more cool, level headed, and intellectually honest way before resorting to war like activities to deal with what amounts to as no more than pest like adversaries.

    The only moral use of force is in retaliation to an immoral application of force by a criminal element be that an individual or a government. When such force is justified, then, in my view, retaliation should be all out with no restrictions until the offending force is either dead or imprisoned and the threat of future force eliminated without qualification.

    But, this is just my opinion and I think it reflects more the views of Jefferson than Bush or Obama.

    • Thanks –Rick,

      Spot on, as usual. One thing that has really struck me as I’ve been reading through this dialogue is the blatantly dishonest approach taken by Dr Delacroix throughout the whole thing.

      Libertarians waiting around to be attacked by Japan?

      95% of all terrorists are Muslims? Etc., etc.

      Thanks for reading along, and just you wait and see what kind of approach Dr Delacroix takes over the next few days!

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