Spanish GDP since 1850

Among the great economic historians is Leandro Prados de la Escosura. Why? Because, before venturing in massively complex explanations to explain academic puzzles, he tries to make sure the data is actually geared towards actually testing the theory. That attracts my respect (probably because it’s what I do as well which implies a confirmation bias on my part). Its also why I feel that I must share his most recent work which is basically a recalculation of the GDP of Spain.

The most important I see from his work is that the recomputation portrays Spain as a less poor place than we have been led to believe – throughout the era. To show how much, I recomputed the Maddison data for Spain and compared it with incomes for the United Kingdom and compared it Leandro’s estimates for Spain relative to those for Britain (the two methods are very similar thus they seem like mirrors at different levels). The figure below emerges (on a log scale for the ratio in percentage points). As one can see, Spain is much closer to Britain than we are led to believe throughout the 19th century and the early 20th century. Moreover, with Leandro’s corrections, Spain convergence towards Britain from the end of the Civil War to today is very impressive.

spanishgdp

The only depressing thing I see from Leandro’s work is that Spain’s productivity (GDP / hours worked) seems to have stagnated since the mid-1980s.

spanishproductivity

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4 thoughts on “Spanish GDP since 1850

  1. Spain’s productivity (GDP / hours worked) seems to have stagnated since the mid-1980s

    A good observation, and it’d be interesting to find out why (if only because it seems like we could draw some loose inferences about the rest of the PIIGS).

    I doubt the EU is to blame, but labor market inflexibility might be the issue. Nobody from Poland or Romania is going to want to migrate to Spain, but plenty of people from Morocco or Tunisia do. I wonder if adding Morocco or Tunisia to the EU would have any effect on productivity…

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