HIGH DEMAND FOR HIGH CHEEKBONES

New York Post reports that another prominent “Pocahontas” has been exposed as a fraud. The most recent one was American “Cherokee” Senator Elizabeth Warren who had masqueraded as a woman of “color” to have a good boost in her early career of a lawyer and academic; later, when exposed, she became a butt of jokes for drawing attention to her “indigenous” high cheekbones. Now it is “Canadian Metis” Carrie Bourassa, scientific director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research’s Institute of Indigenous Peoples’ Health. I wonder why they so eagerly seek to pass for Indians and join the “oppressed.” I suspect that the moral, political, and financial pie that society of “systemic racism” offers to real,  partial, and aspiring Indians is so rich and tasty that it is unbearably hard to resist a temptation not to have a bite of it. Incidentally, her detractors, who became suspicious that she was not a true Indian “Aryan,” do not even catch the irony of the whole situation: Bourassa claimed the Metis lineage; the Metis is a group that had in fact originated as the offspring of Native Americans (or First Nations, according the Canadian political jargon) and early Europeans; therefore, by default they are already not true “Aryans.” Yet, along with the “First Nations,” the Metis have been recognized by the Canadian government as a historically oppressed group that has been singled out for a special political, social, and financial treatment as a protected community. When a government creates moral and financial incentives to be indigenous, it unavoidably has to deal with the host of emerging “tribes,” “first nations,” and “high cheekbone” individuals on both sides of the US-Canadian border. In the meantime, let’s wait for a next episode of that exciting post-Modern politico-economic western that has been on for the past fifty years.


2 thoughts on “HIGH DEMAND FOR HIGH CHEEKBONES

  1. Here in Australia, we have the same problem. A book, called ‘Dark Emu”, had a white man claim to be indigenous, and wrote about the great agricultural practices of the hunter-gatherer Aborigines. Because he claimed to be indigenous, he was given awards, and his fanciful claims have been given credence.

  2. Good commentary. I don’t know why it’s not considered a kind of mental illness and treated as such. By the way, I know a fat blond white man with blue eyes and a white skin that can’t take any sun who claims to be a Mexican. That’s in California, of course. To my knowledge, no one has called his lie, including me. It seems rude, somehow.

Please keep it civil

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