Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 9 of 9)

Conclusions Systemic racism is hard to find. Its most obvious and most widespread instance seems to me to be affirmative action in all its forms. It’s a device that discriminates against many to the benefit of others, based on ascribed, unchangeable characteristics such as sex and race. It was originally designed to favor African Americans … Continue reading Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 9 of 9)

Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 8 of 9)

Reparations To my mind, the inheritance of slavery, segregation, and other forms of discrimination against African-Americans means that something is owed to the descendants of slaves irrespective of the current reality or existence of “systemic racism.” All emotions carefully kept aside, refusing to subscribe to present-day irrationality, I am persuaded that if I looked into … Continue reading Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 8 of 9)

Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 7 of 9)

Do blacks have more police encounters than whites? In 2015, the percentages of whites and blacks who experiences police initiated encounters with the police were equal, a little over 10% each. (Bureau of Justice Statistics.) These rates seem to debunk a popular alternative narrative appearing in the Boston Globe, among other liberal sources, that claims that … Continue reading Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 7 of 9)

Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 6 of 9)

The Justice System; Police Brutality I will mostly bypass now the important issue of possible systemic racism in the in administration of justice itself. I mean charging, convicting and sentencing, which may or may not each involve a systematic (systematic) racial component. Here again, I think the relevant research exists and it has not caught … Continue reading Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 6 of 9)

Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 5 of 9)

Finding Systemic Racism in Employment, Housing, Education, Access to Government. It seems to me that systemic racism should (almost by definition or lack of it) bear upon all aspects of life, with four having special importance. First, I see employment, which affects often profoundly, the quality of one’s life. Second, I would consider housing, same … Continue reading Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 5 of 9)

Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 4 of 9)

A Public Torture-Killing What directly prompted this essay (actually, several years in gestation) is a barbarous act that took place on May 25th 2020 in Minneapolis, that was thoroughly filmed by bystanders, and that triggered several weeks of peaceful protest nation-wide, but also of arson, of looting, and of other acts of rioting. Here is … Continue reading Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 4 of 9)

Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 3 of 9)

Historical Guilt What could induce enough guilt in numerous enough Americans to lead to an acceptance of the belief of racism without racists? I have in mind here, specifically, white Americans. For this relative outsider (again, I am an immigrant), the answer is obvious: white America has never really digested, assimilated the true story of … Continue reading Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 3 of 9)

Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 2 of 9)

The Vanishing of Personalized Racism Not long ago, in my lifetime, racism in America consisted of tangible actions against members of a given physically recognizable group motivated by their belonging to that group. The actions could be individual, such as slurs proffered by a stranger in the street, or variously collective like a company’s deliberate … Continue reading Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 2 of 9)

Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 1 of 9)

Foreword This is a freewheeling and personal essay on the term “systemic racism.” It’s not an empirical study but it’s mindful of facts. It blends my observations as a rationalist with my frankly conservative leanings. I am a religiously indifferent conservative of the constitutionalist, small government breed. I judge representative government the very best we … Continue reading Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take (Part 1 of 9)

Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take

by Jacques Delacroix jdelacroixliberty@gmail.com Foreword This is a freewheeling and personal essay on the term “systemic racism.” It’s not an empirical study but it’s mindful of facts. It blends my observations as a rationalist with my frankly conservative leanings. I am a religiously indifferent conservative of the constitutionalist, small government breed. I judge representative government … Continue reading Systemic Racism: a Rationalist Take

Awareness of Racism and Singing to the Choir

In the past few months, I have been exposed to more works by African Americans and to more documents about the black condition in America than usual. So far, I haven’t learned anything really new, perhaps because I am a sociologist by trade with an interest in slavery going back fifty years. All the same, … Continue reading Awareness of Racism and Singing to the Choir

Three Roads to Racism

Are you a racist? Anyone can feel free to answer this question any way it/she/he wishes; they wish. And that’s the problem. In this short essay, I aim first to do a little vocabulary house-keeping. Second, I try to trace three distinct origins of racism. I operate from thin authority. My main sources are sundry … Continue reading Three Roads to Racism

The Revolt of the Baristas

For several weeks, nearly every night, I have a déjà vu experience. First, I watch Fox News where I see crowds of younger people in dark clothing breaking things, setting buildings on fire, and assaulting police. (I infer they are younger people because of the suppleness of their movements.) Then, I switch to French news on … Continue reading The Revolt of the Baristas

Police Killings and Race: Afterthoughts

The verdict on former officer Chauvin seems extreme to me. I think manslaughter would have been enough. Of course, it’s possible that I don’t understand the legal subtleties. Also, I did not receive all the information the jurors had access to. Also, I didn’t have to make up my mind under the pressure of fearing … Continue reading Police Killings and Race: Afterthoughts