From the Comments: Military Alliances and the Free Rider Problem

Dr van de Haar’s excellent post on secession and alliances prompted the following from yours truly: I think you highlight well the difference in opinion, on foreign policy, between libertarians/classical liberals in Europe and the United States. Alliances are sometimes a good option, and it pains me to see American libertarians dogmatically reject alliances in … Continue reading From the Comments: Military Alliances and the Free Rider Problem

The European Union Needs More States, Not More Territory

The recent uproar over the upcoming vote on the potential secession of Scotland from Great Britain illustrates well the European Union’s foreign policy weaknesses. The EU’s potential to increase the number of states within its borders without having to expand its geographic space is an overlooked avenue to reaching a bolder, more sophisticated foreign policy. … Continue reading The European Union Needs More States, Not More Territory

Are libertarians more intelligent than conservatives and liberals?

The short answer is “yes.” Jonathan Haidt, a moral psychologist at NYU’s Stern School of Business, published a paper in 2012 with three colleagues exploring libertarian morality. Dr Haidt is well-known for his work on studying morality among conservatives and liberals in the US, but has become increasingly interested in libertarians (or, at least, he … Continue reading Are libertarians more intelligent than conservatives and liberals?

Creative Destruction in the Levant

Creative destruction ain’t just a place for the marketplace, baby! The National Interest has an article out by Mark Donig on “The Twilight of Sykes-Picot.” It’s a great piece that basically acknowledges the end of an era (European imperialism and cartographic arrogance), and what this will mean for the United States. Sykes-Picot is an agreement … Continue reading Creative Destruction in the Levant

Karl Marx and Special Interests

[Note: this is an old musing of mine written back in May of 2011. I hope it is still as fresh today as it was back then.] Karl Marx’s economic theories have long been disproved (theoretically as soon as they came out, and practically with the fall of the Berlin Wall), and tens, if not … Continue reading Karl Marx and Special Interests

A European Union of More Nations?

Wouldn’t that be so bad ass? Or am I just a geek? The New York Times picks up on concepts that libertarians have been talking about for years. From the article: The great paradox of the European Union, which is built on the concept of shared sovereignty, is that it lowers the stakes for regions … Continue reading A European Union of More Nations?

More Musings on Colonialism

I recently attended an excellent lecture at Cabrillo College, located in central California, by an International Relations scholar who focused on the effects of colonialism. We took a solid look at the ‘World Systems Theory’ of why the developing world is, well, developing, and it was great to go over this school of thought’s main arguments. … Continue reading More Musings on Colonialism

Bizarre Love Triangle: Towards a New Internationalism

Isolationist screeds in the United States are extremely rare these days, which, in my opinion, makes those who promote this noble doctrine to be individuals of exceptional character.  I am a regular reader of the blog Eunomia (authored by Dr. Daniel Larison), which explicates isolationist critiques of current foreign policy (among other things), and I always … Continue reading Bizarre Love Triangle: Towards a New Internationalism