Somalia and Anarchy: Links Edition

I am too lazy to write much more on Somalia right now (you can always check out my latest piece again if you are really itching for something satisfying), so I have compiled a list of great pieces I have read over the past couple days on Somalia, Anarchy, and the idea that post-colonial states … Continue reading Somalia and Anarchy: Links Edition

Hillary Clinton on Somalia: More of the Same

Hillary Clinton has recently called for more effort on the part of the West in the War on Terror’s Horn of Africa region by issuing threats of sanctions and more military troops in the region recently (ht John Glaser). The threats of sanction, which libertarians consider an act of war, have been issued to states … Continue reading Hillary Clinton on Somalia: More of the Same

What on earth was the Dervish state?

That’s the topic of my latest column at RealClearHistory. An excerpt: 2. Sovereignty and suzerainty are concepts that have little to no bearing on today’s world, but perhaps they should. Prior to the end of World War II, when the U.S. and U.S.S.R. became the globe’s alpha powers, suzerainty was often used by imperial powers to … Continue reading What on earth was the Dervish state?

A libertarian case for Hillary Clinton

I have abstained from commenting on the American presidential race between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton (sorry Rick) for so long because I just wasn’t very interested in it. I’m still not that interested in it, but the topic has come up quite a bit lately here at NOL so I thought I’d throw in my … Continue reading A libertarian case for Hillary Clinton

Should Somaliland be recognized as a state by the international “community”?

I’ve gone on record here at NOL as stating that one of the big problems facing advocates of individual liberty today is the failure of the international system to recognize calls for autonomy from sub-state actors, and that one of the best ways to do this is by counterintuitively incorporating that new autonomy into the … Continue reading Should Somaliland be recognized as a state by the international “community”?

The Lowest Levels of Love (with apologies to Dr Amburgey)

Different Types of Love scale The Different Types of Love scale is a 40-item measure of loving feelings toward four different groups. Participants indicate agreement with statements concerning friends […], family […], generic others […], and their romantic partner […] Results. Table 4 shows that libertarians showed the lowest levels of loving feelings toward others, across all … Continue reading The Lowest Levels of Love (with apologies to Dr Amburgey)

Calls for harsh criticism: my first (of four) graduate school statement of purpose

Note: this is my statement of purpose (SOP) for a graduate program in anthropology at Emory University. I am also going to apply to Stanford, New Mexico, and Chicago. This is only a rough draft. I have given myself plenty of time to make these perfect, so I am posting this here in order to … Continue reading Calls for harsh criticism: my first (of four) graduate school statement of purpose

Around the Web

A Republic of Cuckoo Clocks: Switzerland and the History of Liberty (pdf) Pastoralism in a Stateless Environment: The Case of the Southern Somalia Borderlands (pdf) The Profits of Power: Land Rights and Agricultural Investment in Ghana (pdf) Rethinking Postcolonial Democracy: An Examination of the Politics of Lower-Caste Empowerment in North India (pdf) Working Across Borders: … Continue reading Around the Web

Around the Web

What if Leo Strauss was right? How many people does the War on Drugs put in prison? Sympathy for the Devil: Palestine’s Tragic Collaborators (movie review of Omar) The Other Somalia Do black people have equal gun rights? Strategy of Condescension

Ukraine, Russia, the West and a Coasean Bargain?

Economist Tyler Cowen worries about the events in Ukraine: For Russia, matters in Ukraine are close to an existential crisis, as Ukraine is intimately tied up with Russia’s sense of itself as presiding over a mini-empire of sorts.  Nor could an autocratic Russia tolerate a free and prosperous Ukraine, developing along the lines of Poland.  … Continue reading Ukraine, Russia, the West and a Coasean Bargain?

Weekend Question: What to do about the violence in South Sudan?

As many of you may know, the recently-minted country of South Sudan has descended into civil war. I’m going to show you how this violence was actually predictable, but first I want to point out a couple of things. Why did South Sudan get international recognition and not Somaliland, which has been a functioning democracy … Continue reading Weekend Question: What to do about the violence in South Sudan?

From the Comments: Federalism, Small States and Central Banks

Rick Searle asks the following question after reading my argument with George Ayittey on secession in Africa: Brandon, how do you respond to the geopolitical and macro-economic arguments in favor of strong federalism rather than small-state nationalism? The experience of Central Europe after the First World War seems to offer a telling example of what … Continue reading From the Comments: Federalism, Small States and Central Banks

Why Would Somali Militants Attack A Kenyan Shopping Mall?

I was going to write up a small essay on this topic, but economist Joe Salerno beat me to it. I’ll just reproduce it here: The U.S. government and the establishment media are in a quandary.   How are they to explain  the heinous attack on a Kenyan shopping mall by Al Shabab a militant … Continue reading Why Would Somali Militants Attack A Kenyan Shopping Mall?

Libertarian Foreign Policy: A Dialogue on Imperialism

I can’t afford ganja. I am not sloppy. The problem is that you and I are bumping against basic value preferences. I think you and yours love peace too much, at any cost. I have finally vanquished you. Your argument for military intervention around the world has been reduced, it would seem, to one of … Continue reading Libertarian Foreign Policy: A Dialogue on Imperialism