In Search of Firmer Cosmopolitan Solidarity: The Need for a Sentimentalist Case for Open Borders

Most arguments for open borders are phrased in terms of universalized moral obligations to non-citizens. These obligations are usually phrased as “merely” negative (eg., that Americans have a duty to not impede the movement an impoverished Mexican worker or Syrian refugee seeking a better life) rather than positive (eg., that the first obligation does not imply … Continue reading In Search of Firmer Cosmopolitan Solidarity: The Need for a Sentimentalist Case for Open Borders

What’s the difference between open borders and Open Borders?

There are two meanings here. I’ll define them below: There are open borders, where borders are open and anyone can move between them There are Open Borders, where borders to rich states are open to people from poor states, but the borders to poor states are closed to immigration Open borders are fairer than closed … Continue reading What’s the difference between open borders and Open Borders?

Most Arguments Against Open Borders Lead to Extremely Un-Libertarian Positions

One thing that strikes me about libertarians who oppose open borders is that they approach the issue of immigration completely different from how libertarians approach nearly every other issue. Arguments against immigration typically go as follows: Bad effect x will happen if we allow open borders. Therefore, the government is justified in restricting immigration. For … Continue reading Most Arguments Against Open Borders Lead to Extremely Un-Libertarian Positions

The death knell of Open Borders?

The world of the 1990s and aughts is now gone. A borderless, wall-less world will be relegated to the musty, threadbare realm of academia and on the white papers of a few brave think tanks. The flood of war refugees from Syria has been overwhelming Europe’s political and cultural sensibilities (Europe’s political sensibilities are quite … Continue reading The death knell of Open Borders?

From the Comments: Mass Migration and Open Borders

Fears of mass migration are overblown. Each person who migrates must cover certain costs – one must abandon one’s social network, often must abandon property, must fund transportation and the transition. For instance, when I crossed America from Pennsylvania to California, I had to pay for transportation expenses, the first month’s rent, a security deposit, … Continue reading From the Comments: Mass Migration and Open Borders

From the Comments: Open Borders and Substantial Increases in GDP

Dr Delacroix gives us a great review of the most recent literature on the relationship between open borders and substantial increases in GDP (50%-150%): A Long Comment on The Big Thing (open borders) Thank you, Rick, for causing me to read this very good paper (and thanks to Brandon for making it easily available). I … Continue reading From the Comments: Open Borders and Substantial Increases in GDP

From the Comments: Open Borders, Immigration and the Sociology of Gradualism

Dr Delacroix takes issue with my woefully inadequate summary of his work on open borders in the Independent Review. He writes: Small yet somewhat important correction: In our piece in the Independent Review, Nikiforov and I argue for somewhat more than a guest worker program and our reference is not a to a EU “guest … Continue reading From the Comments: Open Borders, Immigration and the Sociology of Gradualism

Towards a genuinely Inclusive, Liberal, and Open Global Agenda

The recent past has been witness to the increasing rise of ‘economic-nationalism’, anti-immigration policies, and increasing xenophobia. Countries which in the past have welcomed immigrants, and have been protagonists of Free Trade and open borders, while immensely benefiting from the same, are becoming more and more insular. While this point got strongly reiterated by the … Continue reading Towards a genuinely Inclusive, Liberal, and Open Global Agenda

From the Comments: who is the conservative or libertarian equivalent of Nancy MacLean?

Rick posed a great question about Nancy MacLean awhile back. I haven’t been neglecting it. I’ve been thinking about it. Here it is: Question for those more abreast than me: do conservatives or libertarians have an equivalent of Nancy MacLean? All sides have irresponsible pseudo-scholars, but how often do the various camps launch one of … Continue reading From the Comments: who is the conservative or libertarian equivalent of Nancy MacLean?

Legal Immigration Into the United States (Part 20): Transitional Measures and Conclusions

We must recognize than any orderly system used to select and admit immigrants involves a degree of bureaucratic slowness. Hence, the existing family preference-based program would have to be extended for several years, maybe as long as ten, while accepting no more new applications. It’s likely that the compromise solution would even have to be … Continue reading Legal Immigration Into the United States (Part 20): Transitional Measures and Conclusions

Legal Immigration Into the United States

Jacques Delacroix jdelacroixliberty@gmail.com I am grateful to Stephen Cox, Editor of Liberty Unbound for firm editorial suggestions and for civilized contradiction. This an essay about legal immigration. It includes a theoretical framework, essential facts, and subjective opinions. In this old-fashioned piece, there is no pretense of scholarly detachment. It’s a personal endeavor that I hope … Continue reading Legal Immigration Into the United States

Legal Immigration Into the United States (Part 18): Reforms I Would Favor

Now, here is what I, personally, a US citizen and an appreciative immigrant, as well as a small government conservative, would like to see happen: As I pointed out before, most liberals and quite a few conservatives perceive allowing all immigration as a sort of altruistic gesture. That includes those who do not overtly call … Continue reading Legal Immigration Into the United States (Part 18): Reforms I Would Favor