Be Our Guest: “How to make Brexit Really Worthwhile – Example: Financial Regulation”

Be Our Guest is an open invitation to NOL‘s readers to participate with us. Pretty much anything is on the table. The latest article comes from the Freeconomist, who is following up on his earlier piece about making Brexit worthwhile via information asymmetries. His new piece is on financial regulation through the prism of Brexit. … Continue reading Be Our Guest: “How to make Brexit Really Worthwhile – Example: Financial Regulation”

How to make Brexit Really Worthwhile – Example: Financial Regulation

The Freeconomist contact@belowpotential.com One area where competencies are, at the moment, almost completely centralized at the European level is financial regulation. This post explains how explicit and implicit government guarantees for bank debt incentivize banks to take on excessive risk. The vast amount of financial regulations produced by governments over the decades constitutes the hapless … Continue reading How to make Brexit Really Worthwhile – Example: Financial Regulation

Be Our Guest: “How to make Brexit Really Worthwhile – Example: Regulation dealing with Information Asymmetries”

Here is the latest installment of NOL‘s new “Be Our Guest” series, this one by the pseudonymous Freeconomist. An excerpt: Third-party certification provides assurance to consumers that a product or a supplier of professional services meets certain quality standards. Private suppliers of third-party certification include organisations such as Consumer Reports, the American Automobile Association (AAA), which rates … Continue reading Be Our Guest: “How to make Brexit Really Worthwhile – Example: Regulation dealing with Information Asymmetries”

How to make Brexit Really Worthwhile – Example: Regulation dealing with Information Asymmetries

The Freeconomist contact@belowpotential.com In my last post I argued that Brexit in the sense of merely shifting powers from politicians and bureaucrats in Brussels to politicians and bureaucrats in London would unlikely lead to a significant improvement of the legal and regulatory framework governing British society because laws and regulations would still be the product of a centralized ordering authority rather … Continue reading How to make Brexit Really Worthwhile – Example: Regulation dealing with Information Asymmetries

Doctor Who – a commentary on Brexit?

The Doctor has always had a special preference for the Brits. They flit in and out of the wondrous and often alien-infested towns of England, woo them with their British (briefly Scottish) accent and manage to introduce to the kids (it was originally intended to be an educational program for the kids) some moral propositions. … Continue reading Doctor Who – a commentary on Brexit?

Brexit Breakdown and Confusion

I posted earlier this month on Brexit Breakdown suggesting that the aims of enthusiasts for the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, leaving the European Union, have been eroded as the UK government’s positions drifts towards ‘soft Brexit’ accepting alignment with EU regulations on industrial goods and food, at the very least. This is … Continue reading Brexit Breakdown and Confusion

Brexit Breakdown

Ir has been obvious for at least a month now that soft Brexit has won out in the UK, though the Prime Minister Theresa May would never admit such a thing directly. Government discussion of access to the EU internal market at its existing level, or very close, and keeping the border open between the … Continue reading Brexit Breakdown

Latest thoughts on Brexit: Its Decay, Italy (and Ireland), Cars, and Giving up British Citizenship

The slow decay of Brexit: a Rule-Taking Country I don’t mean that the UK will stay in the EU. I fully expect it to formally depart next year. If the poor performance of the UK economy compared with the Eurozone continues, I also expect the UK to rejoin in a few decades, when the growth … Continue reading Latest thoughts on Brexit: Its Decay, Italy (and Ireland), Cars, and Giving up British Citizenship

Ricardo and Ringo for a free-trade Brexit

My colleague, Shruti Rajagopalan, points out that today is the 200th Anniversary of the publication of David Ricardo’s  On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation. It was here that the notion of comparative advantage began confounding protectionists and nativists. Shruti offers this famous example of it in practice: Apparently, when asked if Ringo Starr … Continue reading Ricardo and Ringo for a free-trade Brexit

Why Brexit is bad for Liberty

I have been debating classical liberalism and the European Union with Edwin van de Haar. For the moment at least, I think the debate should end or we will risk repetition of previously made points. I would like to thank Edwin for a constructive debate and to invited readers to read through it themselves. Now … Continue reading Why Brexit is bad for Liberty

From the Comments: Pushback in favor of Brexit

Dr Stocker‘s recent post arguing against Brexit elicited the following response from Chhay Lin in the ‘comments’ threads, and I think it’s worth highlighting in a post of its own: Very well explained, Barry Stocker. Although it can be good for Britain to leave the EU, it entirely depends on how they go on from … Continue reading From the Comments: Pushback in favor of Brexit

Brexit, free trade, and the EU

I posted this on Facebook twenty hours before the results were known: The United Kingdom will not leave the EU. If it does, there will be concrete talks of a trade agreement between the UK and the Union within a week. Free trade is the best part of the EU anyway. It may be the … Continue reading Brexit, free trade, and the EU

A quick note on the Brexit debacle

I think Barry (here and here) and Edwin (here and here) have made the best contributions to the debate on the EU and sovereignty here at NOL to date, so I’m just going to add a couple of open-ended thoughts to the recent vote (which I think was a huge mistake). One of the big … Continue reading A quick note on the Brexit debacle

Hazony’s nation-state versus Christensen’s federation

Yoram Hazony’s 2018 book praising the nation-state has garnered so much attention that I thought it wasn’t worth reading. Arnold Kling changed my mind. I’ve been reading through it, and I don’t think there’s much in the book that I can originally criticize. The one thing I’ll say that others have not is that Hazony’s … Continue reading Hazony’s nation-state versus Christensen’s federation