Into the ear of every anarchist that sleeps but doesn’t dream…

We must sing, We must sing,We must sing…

 

 

There is no libertarian art.

Well, that is a slight exaggeration, but not much of one. Art is a vital part to any social movement and it is one area where libertarians suffer immensely. Sure there are libertarian leaning authors such as Robert Heinlein and modern Austrian economic art like the guys over at www.econstories.tv but for the most part there are few non-academic ways to inspire potential libertarians.

This is a problem I lament when I am feeling negative about the prospects for a free society which, to be fair, is usually the case. Sometimes reading an article about Intellectual Property just isn’t enough to get the passion flowing.

“But Wait!” You say, “you failed to mention the author who brought tens of thousands of people into the libertarian fold. The late, the great, the Ayn Rand!”

 

….yea about that.

 

I don’t like Ayn Rand. There, I said it. Bring out the pitchforks and tie me to a Rearden Steel railroad track if you must but I stand by my statement. Now I know what you are all thinking: “But her works exemplify the individual freedoms that a libertarian society should strive for!” or “Dagny is a strong independent woman who don’t need no government!”

Yes, I am aware, but it isn’t Ayn Rand the author I dislike. Actually it isn’t even Ayn Rand the person that I dislike. I don’t like the idea of Ayn Rand. The metaphysical zeitgeist that surrounds and worships her throughout every circle of the libertarian movement from Walter Block to Milton Friedman to every other subscriber on www.reddit.com/r/libertarian.

All too often I have had to argue about libertarianism through the lens of someone whose only exposure to the philosophy is Ayn Rand and the objectivist selfishness that nearly everyone associates with capitalism. In short, I think she is bad for libertarianism and provides no end of ammunition that can be used against those of us with a more nuanced moral/ethical position.

Here is the kicker though. I have not read a single Ayn Rand novel. Not Anthem, not the Fountainhead, and especially not her magnum opus Atlas Shrugged. My knowledge of her works (outside of objectivist philosophy) comes mostly through a bit of osmosis during many diatribes in my conversion to libertarian thought and the first few chapters of Anthem I read in high school before being bored to tears.

I feel that my lack of personal experience with the work of Ayn Rand is a great injustice to someone so influential to many (but certainly not all) of the ideals that I hold so dear and maybe, just maybe, I can siphon off some of the passion that so many others feel when reading her novels.

So it is my objective to spend the next several weeks (months perhaps) reading Atlas Shrugged along with you, the faithful readers here at www.notesonliberty.com, and recording chapter based summaries of my thoughts, opinions, and analysis from a literary, ethical, and philosophical standpoint. These will be full of personal anecdotes and armchair analysis so be prepared for a tumultuous ride through one of the “great?” works of the 20th century.

Part one of many comes tomorrow morning.

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4 thoughts on “Into the ear of every anarchist that sleeps but doesn’t dream…”

    1. Thanks for the heads up, Dr A.

      I took away three things from the article: 1) I don’t think socialism is necessarily more popular among younger voters, I think it’s just misunderstood and sounds nuanced. Once socialism is explained to people (perhaps by others who actually watched people risk life and death to cross the Berlin Wall) it becomes less appealing.

      2) Younger people are indeed becoming more fiscally conservative and socially liberal (libertarian) than their fascistic forebears (both on the Left and the Right). This is a good thing, of course, but what I found most interesting is that younger people found just as much in common with Clinton as they did with Christie. Yet they overwhelmingly chose Clinton over Christie. This suggests that party politics is a brand name issue, not an ideological one, and George W Bush is responsible for destroying the image of the GOP.

      3) Small-L libertarians don’t care about parties. As long as attitudes become more libertarian, who cares if drug liberalization or gay marriage reform (to give two examples) is ultimately enacted by a Democrat or Republican?

      A fourth, minor point: Millennials are irrelevant to politics. We are a minority faction in the American polity (which explains well why Social Security and Medicare/Medicaid aren’t going anywhere anytime soon).

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